Edamame plants almost ready to harvest

edamame

GROWN IN THE USA

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INFO & HOW TO COOK

Edamame (ed-ah-MAH-may), or edible soybean, is a complete protein, meaning it contains all of the essential amino acids. It has many health benefits due to its high nutrient content and doubles as a tasty snack. NaturalNews.com listed it as one of the top 11 Superfoods to pump up your health: Superfoods

It can be boiled or steamed, eaten fresh or frozen.


Serving Size 1 cup prepared

Total Fat 8g

Saturated Fat 1g

Cholesterol 0 (0%)

Sodium 9mg (<1%)

Total Carbohydrate 16g

Dietary Fiber 8g (32%)

*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.


Sugars 3g

Protein 17g

Calories 189

Vitamin A 0%

Vitamin C 16%

Calcium 10%

Iron 20%

Source: USDA

Nutritional Information

Edamame are a good source of magnesium, potassium, phosphorus, calcium, and manganese, as well as fiber, isoflavins, omega-3 fatty acids, B-vitamins, vitamin C and vitamin E. Edamame and soybeans are a complete protein, which is unusual for a vegetable. Also, they are high in phytoestrogens, a natural plant estrogen.

Since edamame contains so many necessary minerals and nutrients, and is a complete protein, the FDA supports its health benefits. It may even help provide relief from hot flashes and night sweats in women experiencing perimenopause.

As with anything in life though, moderation is the key, especially if one is prone to the effects that the fiber in legumes can produce.

Cooking:Microwaving 1-1-1

1. Place 1 cup beans in a bowl.
2. Sprinkle 1 teaspoon of water on them
3. Microwave on high for 1 minute or less.
(depends on maturity of the bean, remove when they start splitting open)
4. For bright green look, plunge into icewater for a few seconds.
5. Drain edamame.
6. Place in bowl, sprinkle on large grain salt like sea salt

Remove beans from salted pods by pulling the pods between your teeth and popping out the beans. Pods should be firm yet beans will pop out when pressure is applied.

Cooking: Boiling or Steaming

1. Bring pan of salted water to a rapid boil
2. Boil or steam pods 4-7 minutes after water boils again
(depends on maturity of the bean, remove when they start splitting open)
3. For bright green look, plunge into icewater for a few seconds.

4. Drain edamame.
5. Place in bowl, sprinkle on large grain salt like sea salt

Remove beans from salted pods by pulling the pods between your teeth and popping out the beans. Pods should be firm yet beans will pop out when pressure is applied.

Storing: Short term

Raw or cooked edamame can be refrigerated about one week to 10 days.

Storing: Long term - Blanch & Freeze

1. Bring pan of salted water to a boil
2. Boil edamame 2 - 3 minutes after water boils again
3. Drain and dry on paper towel to cool
4. Freeze on cookie sheet individually about 2 hours
4. Store in freezer bag in freezer up to 6-8 months.

History

Edamame has its roots in China, dating back to more than 2200 years ago. It was later introduced to Japan, where it has been popular ever since. The word edamame means "beans on a branch". Unlike most soybeans grown for livestock feed or soil-replenishers, edamame varieties are developed for their larger size and sweet flavor and are harvested when they are green and plump.

In 1902, it was brought to the United States, but didn't catch on as a snack food until the 1970s and the growth of the organic food movement.

Today, edamame continues to expand in the health food snack industry as consumers become more interested in healthy food options. One of the goals of Sun Sugar Farms is to introduce edamame into schools as part of a nutritional yet delicious lunch.

SUN SUGAR FARMSsun sugar cherry tomatoVERONA KY, 888.883.7259
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